Program of Studies » Social Studies

Social Studies

 
Social Studies
 

The Milford High School Social Studies Department offers a variety of required and elective courses in response to student needs and interests. Drawn from the realms of history, social sciences, and related disciplines, all of the courses aim to meet our fundamental goal of producing students equipped with the skills and knowledge needed to be effective and productive citizens.
 
9th Grade American History 9>10th Grade American History 10/Civics>11th Grade Modern World
 
Required Courses: 
Grade 9: American History 9
Grade 10: American History 10 w/ Civics
Grade 11: Modern World Studies
 
 
American History 9
(Std. A)
 
0230
American History 9
(Honors)
 
0233
(Honors & A-level NH Scholars eligible)
American History 9
(Std. B)
 
0231
1 Credit  Grade 9
American History 9: This course in American history, begins with the post-Civil War era and ends with World War II. Students will cover the Gilded Age, American Imperialism, WWI, the Interwar years, and World War II. Students use primary and secondary sources to produce projects, essays, and presentations. Required credit for graduation.
Expectation: Complex Thinker (Std. A), Self-Directed Learner (Std. B), Quality Producer
(Honors), Social Expectations (Supt).
 
 
American History 10
(Std. A)
 
0222
American History 10
(Honors)
 
0224
(Honors & A-level NH Scholars eligible)
American History 10
(Std. B)
 
0223
1/2 Credit  Grade 10
American History 10: This course in American history begins with The Cold War Period and ends with Modern Immigration. Students will learn about the Cold War at home and globally - this will include McCarthyism and The Vietnam War - as well as the Civil Rights Movement, political change in the 21st century and global and national dilemmas.
Expectation: Complex Thinker (Std. A), Self-Directed Learner (Std. B), Quality Producer (Honors), Social Expectations (Supt).
 
 
US and NH
Civics (Std. A)
 
0235
US and NH
Civics (Honors)
 
0237
(Honors & A-level NH Scholars eligible)
US and NH
Civics (Std. B) 
 
0236 
1/2 Credit  Grade 10
US and NH Civics: This course will include numerous topics in the study of civics. Students will learn about the philosophical foundations of government, the Framers and creation of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, political parties and elections, the US judicial system and civics in action.
Expectation: Community Contributor (Honors), Community Contributor (A-level), Social Expectations (B-level), Self-Directed Learner (Supported)
 
 
Modern World
Studies (Honors)
 
0262
Modern World
Studies (Std. A)
 
0260
(Honors & A-level NH Scholars eligible)
Modern World
Studies (Std. B) 
 
0261
1 Credit  Grade 11
Modern World Studies begins with a study of geography. Students learn of the development of countries of four areas including but not limited to, those of South Africa, China, Brazil, and the Middle East. Students use a variety of primary and secondary sources to examine the impact of religion, economics, geography and politics on current global issues. Students will read selected primary and secondary sources, and demonstrate knowledge through quizzes, tests, papers, projects, and presentations. This course fulfills one required credit for graduation.
Expectation: Civic Expectations
 
 
Social Studies Electives
 
 
Contemporary Asia  0281 
1 Credit  Grades: 11-12
Students explore traditional ways, historic trends, environmental influences and contemporary changes in Asia with an empha-sis on India, Japan, Tibet and China. Students learn of the Asian philosophies of Hindu, Buddhist, Sikh, Taoist, Confucian, and Shinto thought. Students demonstrate knowledge of a wide range of political topics including Japan’s Samurai era, Gandhi and India’s independence, and the struggle over Tibet. Students produce examples of cultural traditions such as Chinese calligraphy, Tibetan art, and Japanese poetry. From Bollywood to Japanese Anime to Korean Pop students analyze quality Asian contemporary media in film, music and literature. Students read selected original source and analytical material, demonstrate knowledge through quizzes, projects and produce journal-based portfolios. Active participation is an important aspect of this course.
Expectation: Civic Expectations
 
 
Criminal and Tort
Law Studies (Std.) 
 
0278 
1/2 Credit  Grades: 10-12
Criminal and Tort Law Studies introduces students to the basics and practical applications of the criminal and tort law systems. Students will explore the origins of law and the need for justice systems in society. Students will gain an understanding of the criminal and tort justice process beginning with the ideas of what a crime is through arrests, search warrants, the booking and arraignment process, trial and punishment. An important focus of this class is the practical application of a student’s rights and responsibilities as a partici-pant in the legal system.
Expectation: Civic Expectations
 
 
Current Global Topics 0289 
1/2 Credit  Grades: 11-12
Current Global Topics is an interac-tive, discussion-centered course looking to help students to analyze and debate issues facing the global community and ever changing current events. Along with the content of the news, students will study the changing nature of news coverage and the popular media treatment of issues in order to become informed citizens and critical consumers of the news. Topics will include, but are not limited to, national and global economies, global terrorism, geopolitical issues, energy policies and environmental sustainability. Students will regularly access the news, participate in classroom and online discussions, and complete individual and group projects and presentations. Active participation is an important aspect for this class.
Expectation: Civic Expectations
 
 
European History
AP (Honors/AP)
 
0270
2 Credits  Grades: 11-12
Students examine the cultural, economic, political, and social developments within Europe and the various ways Europe has influenced the world, from 1450 through contemporary Europe. Topics include the Renaissance, the Reformation, Absolutism, the Enlightenment, French and Russian Revolutions, as well as both World Wars. Nightly readings, a summer assignment and multiple research projects and essays are written over the course of the class. This is a full–year course that fulfills Modern World Studies requirement or can be taken as an elective.
Expectation: Complex Thinker
Prerequisite: Successful completion of American History 9H and American History 10H with a B or higher and / or teacher recommendation
 
 
Topics in European
History (Std. A) 
 
0269 
1 Credit  Grades: 10-12
This course is designed to introduce students to some major events in European history. Topics can include, but are not limited to the Renaissance and Reformation, the Enlightenment, and the French and Russian Revolutions. Special attention will be given to examining art, music literature, as well as the influence of geography on the region. Students will read selected primary and secondary sources, and demonstrate knowledge through quizzes, tests, papers, projects and/or presentations. Active participation is an important aspect of this course.
Expectation: Self-directed learner
 
 
Historiography (Std. A)  0297 
1/2 Credit  Grades: 10-12
Historiography is the study of the methods, principles and theories of historical research and writing. In this class students will learn advanced researching skills using a wide variety of resources with a focus on analysis and interpretation. Students will work to improve oral and multi-media presentations, debating and critical and analytical writing skills. Historiography is a project-based class directed toward those students who have a keen interest in history and who wish to participate in the New Hampshire Scholars Program and/or the National History Day program. Each student will select their own semester long, historical research project that will culminate in a presentation to their peers and members of the faculty.
Expectation: Self-directed learner
 
 
Holocaust
Studies (Std.) 
 
0291
1 Credit  Grades: 11-12
This course introduces students to the political, social, and economic causes of genocide in general, and the Nazi Holocaust in particular. An examination of what made the Jews vulnerable to persecution, the three step plan that Hitler and the Third Reich instituted for the annihilation of the Jewish people, and the roles of perpetrators, victims, rescuers, and bystanders is undertaken using a variety of resources. Our study addresses the questions, controversies and enduring issues raised by the Holocaust. Assessments include research projects, electronic presentations, tests, quizzes and homework. This course fulfills an elective credit in Social Studies.
Expectation: Self-Directed Learner
 
 
Introduction to
Social Science (Std.) 
 
0283 
1 Credit  Grades: 11-12
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the study of human behavior. As social scientists, we will pursue answers to questions relating to psychological and sociological method and terminology, human behavioral development and personality, emotions and the intellect and families and social groups. Finally, we will explore topics for which answers as yet do not exist, such as extrasensory perception, causes of psychosis, prejudice, and the future of humans. Requirements include papers, tests, lab activities, and class participation.
Expectation: Complex Thinker
 
 
Introduction to
Issues in Western
Philosophy 
 
 
0287 
1 Credit  Grades: 11-12
Who are you? What is real? What is truth? Does freewill exist? In exploring these and other philosophical questions students learn of western philosophical thought from the ancient Greeks to the present age. Students demonstrate, both informally and formally, the Socratic Method in strengthening reasoning abilities, discussion skills, and appreciation for diverse points of view. Philosophical principles are applied to current ethical and moral issues. Students read selected original source and analytical material, demonstrate knowledge through quizzes, projects and produce journal-based portfolios. Active participation is an important aspect of this course.
Expectation: Civic Expectations
 
 
United States
History AP
(Honors/AP) 
 
 
0271 
2 Credits  Grades: 10-12
Students will examine the history of the United States from Pre-Columbian origins to Colonial American and the Revolution. The course continues through the Civil War, the Progressive Era, and concludes with the post-Cold War Era. Students can expect a summer assignment, nightly readings, multiple research projects and essays over the course of the class. This is a full-year, elective course and can be taken in lieu of the American History 10 course.
Expectation: Complex Thinker
Prerequisite: Successful completion of American History 9H with a grade of B or higher and teacher recommendation. Students in grade 9 wishing to register for this course will need to submit a writing sample to the AP teacher
 
 
We the People (Honors)  0284 
1 Credit  Grades: 11-12
This course emphasizes the study of the U.S. Judicial system from the Judiciary Act of 1789 to the present. Students will concentrate on landmark cases that have shaped our history, the makeup of our Supreme Court, and on how the attitudes and values of the time shape our Supreme Court decisions. Students will analyze our federal and state constitutions, as well as Supreme Court opinions. If the course is offered in the first semester, students enrolled in the program must compete in the “We the People…” Competition. If the course if offered in the second semester, students must compete in the state Mock Trial Program.
Expectation: Civic Expectations
 
 
 
World War II
Studies (Std.) 
 
0292 
1 Credit  Grades: 10-12
World War II Studies is an in-depth look at the economic, political, and military factors that contributed to the greatest conflict known to humanity. Students will explore the economic and political upheaval of the interwar years as well as the diplomatic failures that led to the start of the war. Students will be able to identify the major military campaigns and explain how their outcomes affected the war. Finally students will debate the decisions that brought about the end of the war and its aftermath. This class is open to all students grades 10-12 with no prerequisites required and fulfills 1 elective credit towards the graduation requirements.
Expectation: Self-Directed Learner